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Dried Seaweed Nori Sheets(10sheets)

13.180.011 DREID SEADWEED NORI SHEETS
Article Number : 13.180.011
Unit/Weight : 25gr
Brand : YUEFAN
Country : China

Originally, the term nori was generic and referred to seaweeds including hijiki. One of the oldest descriptions of nori is dated to around the 8th century. In the Taihō Code enacted in 701, nori was already included in the form of taxation.Local people have been described as drying nori in Hitachi Province Fudoki (721–721), and nori was harvested in Izumo Province Fudoki (713–733), showing that nori was used as food from ancient times.In Utsubo Monogatari, written around 987, nori was recognized as a common food. The original nori was formed as a paste,[citation needed] and the sheet form was invented in Asakusa, Edo (contemporary Tokyo), in the Edo period through the method of Japanese paper-making.

The word "nori" first appeared in an English-language publication in C. P. Thunberg's Trav., published in 1796.It was used in conjugation as "Awa nori", probably referring to what is now called aonori.

The word nori started to be used widely in the United States, and the product (imported in dry form from Japan) became widely available at natural food stores and Asian-American grocery stores in the 1960s due to the influence of the macrobiotic movement, and in the 1970s with the growing number of sushi bars and Japanese restaurants.

In one study by Jan-Hendrik Hehemann, subjects of Japanese descent have been shown to be able to digest the polysaccharide of the seaweed, after gut microbes developed the enzyme from marine bacteria. Gut microbes from the North American subjects lacked these enzymes.

Preparation:

 Nori is commonly used as a wrap for sushi and onigiri. It is also a garnish or flavoring in noodle preparations and soups. It is most typically toasted prior to consumption (yaki-nori in Japanese). A common secondary product is toasted and flavored nori (ajitsuke-nori in Japanese), in which a flavoring mixture (variable, but typically soy sauce, spices, and sugar in the Japanese style or sesame oil and salt in the Korean style) is applied in combination with the toasting process. It is also eaten by making it into a soy sauce-flavored paste, nori no tsukudani (海苔の佃煮).

Nori is sometimes used as a form of food decoration.

A related product, prepared from the unrelated green algae Monostroma and Enteromorpha, is called aonori (青海苔 literally blue/green nori) and is used like herbs on everyday meals, such as okonomiyaki and yakisoba.

Since nori sheets easily absorb water from the air and degrade, a desiccant is indispensable when storing it.